For Work / Against Work
Debates on the centrality of work

References for Theme: The Nietzsche Lectures

  • Heidegger, Martin
    • Nietzsche: Volumes One and Two (1991)
      (p.113) […] it is an old lesson based on incontrovertible experience that academically organized community efforts, arranged and outfitted for some more or less specific purpose, and "cooperative labors" among the sciences springing from utilitarian motives petrify sooner or later. They grow hollow and vacuous, precisely because of the excessive proximity, the familiarity, and the "routine" shared by the co-workers.
    • Nietzsche: Volumes One and Two (1991)
      (p.124) Three good things are proper to art: elegance, logic, beauty; along with something even better: the grand style. When Nietzsche says that these remain foreign to the "masses," he does not mean the class concept of the "lower strata" of the population. He means "educated" people, in the sense of mediocre cultural Philistines, the kind of people who promoted and sustained the Wagner cult. The farmer and the worker who is really caught up in his machine world remain entirely unmoved by swaggering heroics. These are craved only by the frenetic petit bourgeois. His world-rather, his void-is the genuine obstacle...
    • Nietzsche: Volumes One and Two (1991)
      (p.174) [Quoting Plato] "But, of course, the Ideas for the clusters of these implements are two: one in which 'bedframe' becomes manifest, and one in which 'table' shows itself." Here Plato clearly refers to the fact that the permanence and selfsameness of the "Ideas" is always peri ta polla, "for the cluster of the many and as embracing the many." Hence it is not some arbitrary, undefined permanence. But the philosophic search does not thereby come to an end. It merely attains the vantage point from which it may ask: how is it with those many produced items, those implements, in...
    • Nietzsche: Volumes One and Two (1991)
      (p.175) But there is something else we have to emphasize in the fact that craftsmen manufacture implements. For the Greeks themselves it was clearly granted, but for us it has become rather hazy, precisely because of its obviousness. And that is the fact that what is manufactured or produced, which formerly was not in being, now "is." It "is." We understand this "is." We do not think very much about it. For the Greeks the "Being" of manufactured things was defined, but differently than it is for us. Something produced "is" because the Idea lets it be seen as such, lets...
    • Nietzsche: Volumes One and Two (1991)
      (p.176) But how would it be if there were a  man, [hos panta poiei, hosaper heis hekastos ton cheirotechnon (596c)], "who produced everything that every single other craftsman" is able to make? That would be a man of enormous powers, uncanny and astonishing. In fact there is such a  man: hapanta ergadzetai, "he produces anything and every-thing." He can produce not only implements, [alla kai ta ek tes ges phuomena hapanta poiei kai zoia panta ergadzetai], "but also what comes forth from the earth, producing plants and animals and every-thing else"; kai heauton, "indeed, himself too," and besides that, earth and...
    • Nietzsche: Volumes One and Two (1991)
      (p.80) With the distinction of hyle-morphe, which pertains to beings as such, a second concept is coupled which comes to guide all inquiry into art: art is techne. We have long known that the Greeks name art as well as handicraft with the same word, techne, and name correspondingly both the craftsman and the artist technites. In accordance with the later "technical" use of the word techne, where it  designates (in a way utterly foreign to the Greeks) a mode of production, we seek even in the original and genuine significance of the word such later content: we aver that techne...
    • Nietzsche: Volumes One and Two (1991)
      (p.81) If man tries to win a foothold and establish himself among the beings (physis) to which he is exposed, if he proceeds to master beings in this or that way, then his advance against beings is borne and guided by a knowledge of them. Such knowledge is called techne. From the very outset the word is not, and never is, the designation of a "making" and a  producing; rather, it  designates that knowledge which supports and conducts every human irruption into the midst of beings. 
    • Nietzsche: Volumes One and Two (1991)
    • Nietzsche: Volumes Three and Four (1991)
      (p.175) The prepotence of Being in this essential configuration is called machination.* It prevents any kind of grounding of the "projections" that are under its power and yet are themselves none the less powerful. For machination is the prepotence of all unquestioning self-assurance and certitude in securing. Machination alone can hold the stance it adopts toward itself under its unconditioned self-command. Machi-nation makes itself permanent. When meaninglessness comes to power by dint of machination, the suppression of meaning and thus of all inquiry into the truth of Being must be replaced by machination's erection of "goals" (values). One quite reasonably expects...
    • Nietzsche: Volumes Three and Four (1991)
      (p.194) Nietzsche himself in his published works scarcely spoke of will to power. This may be taken as a sign that he wanted to protect as long as possible what was most intrinsic to his recognition of the truth concerning beings, and to take it  into the custody of a  uniquely simple saying. Will to power is mentioned, but not yet singled out as a key expression, in the second part of Thus Spoke Zarathustra (1883). The title of the episode in which the first sovereign insight into the essence of will to power is achieved offers a  clue for the...
    • Nietzsche: Volumes Three and Four (1991)
      (p.196) The age of the fulfillment of metaphysics-which we descry when we think through the basic features of Nietzsche's metaphysics-prompts us to consider to what extent we first find ourselves in the history of Being. It also prompts us to consider-prior to our finding ourselves-the extent to which we must experience history as the re-lease of Being into machination, a  release that Being itself sends, so as to allow its truth to become essential for man out of man's belonging to it.
    • Nietzsche: Volumes Three and Four (1991)
      (p.260) Will to power marks the final metaphysical position of modernity; eternal recurrence implies the end of metaphysics as such (section 2). Will to power may, at least "initially," be identified as quiddity, the "what-being" of beings; recurrence as their existence or "that-being." This distinction coincides with the all-sustaining metaphysical dis-tinction between ontos on (proper being) and me on (nonbeing), in-sofar as the "what?" becomes the guiding question of Western meta-physics. Nietzsche's celebration of Becoming thus actually transforms Becoming into Being; it  remains within the purview of beingness as permanence of presencing and of truth as correctness (section 3). The truth...
    • Nietzsche: Volumes Three and Four (1991)
      (p.267) [From Lecture Analysis By DAVID FARRELL KRELL]-When in "The Question Concerning Technology" Heidegger insists that the essence of technology is nothing technological, that it is rather a "destining of revealing" and hence a turning toward the "saving power" of disclosure as such, is there not a  tendency and a  hope to reach that "immovable center" of technology-its core, its heart, its saving grace, its meaning? Whatever the answer to that question may be, it is important here to emphasize Heidegger's reluctance to assume Ernst Junger's embat-tled yet heroic posture. Indeed, Junger's Nietzscheanism is one that Heidegger can neither embrace nor...
    • Nietzsche: Volumes Three and Four (1991)
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